Ask Questions For The Podcast Here.

Dashboard Forums Weekly Member Message Ask Questions For The Podcast Here.

Tagged: 

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 44 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #1863
    Matthew
    Keymaster

    Do you have a specific question pertaining to drawing? Are you a professional artist with questions about pricing? We will do our best to answer your question in our Weekly Member Message.

    The Weekly Member Message is posted every Monday night.

    Matt

    #3882

    Hi Matt,

    I would like to have some explanations how to use or to participate to the forum. I am a little lost. For example Iwould like to tell you how awesome your masterclass about Tom LOvell is . I loved it. I learned so much from it. Where I can write this or put some pages from my sketchbook ? Thank you for your help.
    Annabelle.

    #3963
    Julie Taylor
    Participant

    hi matt

    I am a self taught artist that skipped over most of the fundamentals of art when I first started learning mainly because I didn’t know and my art teacher in school and college never stressed their importance they just assumed I knew them as my skill level was higher than a lot of the other students back then – it is only because of youtube and your videos that I watched over the last year, that I realised what I’ve been missing. and I very much feel like I have plateaued as a artist unable to move forward till I’ve taken a step back.
    I feel figure drawing ,Anatomy are the main ones which have been totally overlooked, as not knowing where to begin!
    my question should I do the figure drawing from life course at the same time as anatomy lessons will this confuse me to do more than one course at a time (or am I trying to run before I can walk?) or Should I work through them one by one in order?
    I am sure Their are others out there which are like me!
    thanks Julie

    #4009
    Matthew
    Keymaster

    Hi Julie,

    Great question. I can go into depth on this post within the Member Podcast. But for now I would start with the Figure Drawing from Life course.

    Anatomy is more of a long term study. I recommend the bones first. Study one bone a week. Then the muscles.

    Hope this helps,

    Matt

    #4010
    Matthew
    Keymaster

    Annabelle,

    You did great. This is where you can ask me questions for the Monday Podcast.

    The Lovell Master Class was a lot of work so I appreciate your feedback.

    Post your work in the Members Journal.

    Matt

    #4024
    Marjan Van der Donk
    Participant

    Hi Matt,

    A few weeks ago I got a new easel especially for drawing while sitting down. It is a sturdy field easel and I sit in front of it on a flexible low stool. I tilt the drawing board at 45 degrees. But I get the impression that my drawings have been a fraction distorted lately. So now I wonder if I’m doing something not quite right. I have checked the tilt, which is correct. Perhaps the height of the worksurface?

    Thanks,
    Marjan

    Attachments:
    You must be logged in to view attached files.
    #4894
    Gordan Knezic
    Participant

    Hi Matt,
    I am largely self-taught in all art disciplines and techniques I know and don’t have any formal art education. Some of techniques came just naturally I guess kind of felt like I had a knack for it, and most I learned from art books, videos and some workshops. Two years ago I decided to take time and seriously focus on my art development. A desire I feel I always had in me but for one or another reason had to pushed it away and delay to some future more suitable time.
    During these two years I did many things but not following any particular strategy. It all went in rather random fashion. Mostly painted (watercolors and primary landscapes), studied some drawing from Andrew Loomis’s books, and did some oil pastels. That lack of structure bothered me but was not sure what to do.
    I came to conclusion that I need to dedicate lot more time learning and developing my drawing skills. For one I love to draw and two seems to me everything else takes the lead from drawing. Painting being more or less a drawing with the brush.
    I started this week with “Begin here step by step” course. Ones this course is completed I am not sure what will be next? Is it up to me to opt for other courses in sequence that is my preference? What would be your suggestion in which order to take other courses? I am assuming there must be some logic in what to take first and what to take last.
    “Body of work” you propose we make a commitment and produce one on weekly or biweekly basis. Does it matter on what format this work should be done? For someone like me just starting any suggestions on ideas for first Body of work?
    I would appreciate if you would provide a feedback with some guidance.

    Thank you,

    Gordan

    #4909
    Christopher Seliga
    Participant

    Hey Matt,

    By the time of the next member message I will have experienced my first life drawing studio session in about 25yrs. This studio has a single model pose for 3 hours. I’ve been mapping out in my head exactly what I’m going to do for that time period. Most attendees will be using paint but I will more than likely just use graphite or possibly charcoal.

    My question: Most life drawing sessions have a model that does several short poses before a long pose. In mine, it’s one 3 hr pose. How can I best utilize that time? Should I do a few short sketches and work up to a longer (and slower) drawing? What do you suggest?

    Yes, I am getting a little anxious.

    #4977
    Christopher Seliga
    Participant

    (Followup to post above)

    OK, so I survived. Actually it went very well. The model held her pose for 20min. blocks and took a 10 min. break returning to the exact same pose. That’s how the whole session went for three hours. I did three sketches blocking in form and checking angles. Then I selected the one I felt most confident with and started to build on that one with tone. I think that was a good approach to the 3 hr duration. Another way would be to select certain areas to focus on in detail like legs, hands, portrait, etc.

    Most in attendance drew with graphite or charcoal. A few added to their sketches with pastels for tone. One person used acrylic paint and another did watercolor washes.

    #5415
    Gordan Knezic
    Participant

    Hi Matt,

    I have a question that I would appreciate if you can address in the incoming podcast. Weekly life drawing you suggested we do, either figure or still life, and also our body of work drawings. What size should they be? 18″x 24″? Makes a big difference since smaller drawings are mostly drawn from wrist while big from shoulder.
    My understanding is that drawing big is preferable because encourages long sweeping gesture lines and is easier to draw more accurate from shoulder. Certainly technique still need to be mastered. I suppose fewer moving joints would make for easier eye hand coordination.

    I would appreciate your take on this subject?

    Thanks,

    Gordan

    #5593
    Jackie Stone
    Participant

    This year one of my goals is to paint, paint, paint and learn. I have a goal in mind of how many I want to complete, both large and small, but mostly small and quick (well, quick for me). It seems like only every other painting is coming out to my satisfaction. It’s a bit frustrating, and makes me definitely doubt myself at times. But isn’t that what I’m doing this for? I guess other artists doubt themselves too when a painting/drawing doesn’t turn out. But I my question is when should I just stop, realize it’s not working, and move to the next one? It seems to be really hard for me to let go, thinking I should have it in me somewhere to pull out and magically fix a painting gone wrong. I feel like there’s so many things to know, like color, composition, value ratio…..and so much more to think about when creating a piece. Do you have a process to narrow done how to analyze a painting? And when do you walk away from one? Thanks for your thoughts!

    Jackie

    #5594
    Perla Rodriguez
    Participant

    Hi Matt,

    Lately I’ve between working on my lines. I thought keeping my pencil on the paper was going to be a lot easier than it actually is ?. I’ve been experimenting with different ways and tools to sharpen my pencils. Lately I’ve been using a knife and sandpaper. I’ve noticed that my light touch has improved greatly after doing this… I guess the length of the exposed core of the pencil intimidates me and I’m afraid of breaking it.

    How do you feel about students, or artists in general, sharpening their pencils with a knife?

    Thanks in advance!
    -Perla

    #5762
    Jackie Stone
    Participant

    Hi Matt-
    I posted this last week and I think maybe it was missed. Am I posting in the right place for member message questions? I hope this is ok, I’d love your thoughts on my questions.

    This year one of my goals is to paint, paint, paint and learn. I have a goal in mind of how many I want to complete, both large and small, but mostly small and quick (well, quick for me). It seems like only every other painting is coming out to my satisfaction. It’s a bit frustrating, and makes me definitely doubt myself at times. But isn’t that what I’m doing this for? I guess other artists doubt themselves too when a painting/drawing doesn’t turn out. But my question is when should I just stop, realize it’s not working, and move to the next one? It seems to be really hard for me to let go, thinking I should have it in me somewhere to pull out and magically fix a painting gone wrong. I feel like there’s so many things to know, like color, composition, value ratio…..and so much more to think about when creating a piece. Do you have a process to narrow done how to analyze a painting? And when do you walk away from one? Thanks for your thoughts!

    Jackie

    #6295
    Erik Lodin
    Participant

    Hi Matt!

    I don’t know if you’ve realized that I am really lazy… (Mostly because I don’t have much time to spare.)
    Anyway, my laziness is drawing me to explore a rougher and quicker technique of painting. I’m fascinated by artists who can paint rough, yet beautiful, paintings with a very limited amount of brush strokes.
    The attached image by Gregory Manchess is good example of what I’m talking about.
    A few questions:
    1. Is this a style (or just sketches)? If yes, what is the style called? (Painterly, minimalistic, stroke economy?)
    2. Did any of the old masters practice this style or are there any contemporary artists that are successful with this style? (I’m looking for a role model)
    3. Do you have any idea of how to learn this?

    Thanks!

    /Erik

    Attachments:
    You must be logged in to view attached files.
    #6297
    Marty Kulma
    Participant

    thats a very inspirational piece! It may look like a rough painting, but i can imagine that it takes a great deal of consideration for each stroke because it seems like it is all values and surface planes.

    i don’t know if you can get away with being lazy if that is your intent 😉

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 44 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.