Symbolics

Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)
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  • #14091
    Linn Hansson
    Participant

    Hi Matt,
    I’ve been watching your new tutorial series about process and you mention a little bit about symbolics, looking to the left means into the past and to the right to the future, etc. I was wondering if you could make a mini-tutorial some day with what different symbols mean and how you can use them in drawings, paintings, etc. Perhaps I’ve read too much Dan Brown, but I find it fascinating.

    #14106
    Marjan Van der Donk
    Participant

    LOL Linn, not too much Dan Brown! It’s an often overlooked thing, symbols and inferred meaning. Using certain colours and specific flowers are part and parcel of the Old Masters of course. I too would love a mini-course for I hardly know anything about this!

    #14161
    Matthew
    Keymaster

    Linn,

    Listen tot his weeks podcast.

    Matt

    #14169
    Linn Hansson
    Participant

    Marjan,
    I will surely watch more masterclass courses etc since I do not have time to draw. BTW, your painting is so wonderful. I cannot wait to start the painting tutorials online someday soon!!! I just have to save up some money for all the oil paints and the membership!

    #14170
    Marjan Van der Donk
    Participant

    Thanks Linn! Hope the saving goes well πŸ˜‰
    I was fortunate enough to be able to ‘test drive’ water mixable oilpaints, thanks to a friend who lend me hers. Do you know anyone who could help you experimenting to see if it’s for you? Or some of those tiny test tubes at the art store? Watermixable oil paints are ideal, for no odours or toxic mediums (Winsor and Newton or Cobra). I started with six basic classic colours, so it wasn’t too expensive (titanium white, yellow ochre, burnt umber, ultramarine blue (umber + blue makes black!), cadmium red and cad yellow was all I needed initially)! I’ve expanded my colour range gradually (first the umbers and sienna’s), always with a specific colour to use/experiment with. And added some mediums too. It’s an adventure!
    I’m saving up for a nice book on symbolism used by the Old Masters. Sadly, my birthday isn’t till November … long time to wait πŸ˜‰

    #14171
    Linn Hansson
    Participant

    Hi Marjan,
    I actually could not help myself so I just started to try one month at paintintg tutorial online to see if it is for me and what kind of material I will need to save ut to! I have been thinking about watersoluable oil, but I wonder if I can use the same technique that matt teaches? I have just put my baby to sleep and see if I can get some mintues to explore the website. πŸ™‚

    #14172
    Marjan Van der Donk
    Participant

    Ah, love babies, and especially nap time😁
    Yes, exactly the same techniques for traditional and watermixable oils! First I used water instead of turps, now I’ve switched to the special dilutant. No smells (slight odour but that’s all), no headaches and same way of working: I can’t understand why not everyone switches!

    #14173
    Linn Hansson
    Participant

    Lol too bad she never sleeps more than 45 minutes though!
    What kind of surface do you use to paint on? I cannot seem to find illustration boards here in Sweden. We have something called pannΓ₯, which is some kind of cloth glued to some cardboard I think. They do not seem as flexible as the illustrations board matt was talking about. Got a bit discouraged from painting since I cannot seem to find something affordable for me to paint on, except the pannΓ₯-ones but not sure if they have too much texture.

    #14178
    Marjan Van der Donk
    Participant

    I think the panna ones are the same as illustration boards. When I want to experiment, I go to one of those very cheap shops that sell 3 of those boards for €1,45.
    Usually, I work on canvasses from the art store – they have good quality canvasses which are a joy to work on, and the price is good too: 30x40cm and 3 for €10,- Sometimes I use prepared paper, but that is almost as expensive as those canvasses. Because I use vintage frames for my finished artwork (bought from second hand stores), my standard-sized canvasses usually don’t fit, so I started to make my own canvasses. The DIY store provides the (poplar) plywood, I glue the painters-cotton on top of that, gesso it, and at the same price as a store-bought canvas I have a custom-sized great surface to paint on!
    A cheap option for you could be regular MDF with 3 layers of gesso. I used that for a while. Worked great with my acrylics, but it didn’t work for me with the oils. Resembles the famous MUS panels.
    I have a love-hate relationship with texture on canvasses and board! I experimented to find what suits me personally.

    #14198
    Linn Hansson
    Participant

    Oh okay, I didn’t realise they were the same thing. I will check them out. πŸ™‚
    Since I have a baby at home I do not want to use thinners so I might check out those watersoluable paints. Just have to see if I can find colours that suits the palette Matt uses in the tutorials. The range is pretty small so all of the colours are not available.
    I would love to work with real oils some day when I’m not concerned about my baby or cat πŸ™‚

    #14288
    Marjan Van der Donk
    Participant

    Hi Linn, yes, it’s an ongoing and friendly ‘debate’ I get drawn into regularly: what is ‘real paint’, ‘authentic practice’ et cetera πŸ˜‰ My stance at the moment is: whatever! about 65,000 years ago the first humans used red ochre + water to paint the first surfaces. Today, those very same pigments are used still. Inbetween, humans have experimented with adding different mediums to these pigments, like eggs, vinegar, a wide range of (mineral) oils, dilutants, new chemical inventions like acrylic … The more toxic pigments have safer, modern day replacements (fortunately), and the toxic dilutants are being replaced too. Hurrah for science! So: there is no ‘real paint’, there’s just pigments + added mediums = you choose what works best for you!

    #14303
    Marjan Van der Donk
    Participant

    To supplement Matt’s answer: I don’t know which country you live, but here https://www.royaltalens.com/media/4471817/Cobra-Artist-ENG.pdf you can find a solution if you do not want to use de cadmium colours of W&N (if you go for the watermixable paints). I agree with Matt that you should avoid the cad colours, but I disagree with his ‘it’s only 5 or 10 minutes you have the solvents out’. For me, only 10 seconds of the smell of solvents gives me a headache …
    My paintings are all in W&N and Cobra watermixable oils, using the academic processes of painting (so many fat over lean layers from underdrawing to a wash, blocking in the shadowshapes, a grisaille, a layer of burnt sienna for the first warmth, the first layer of colour, second, and at least two glazes over that to add depth in the colours.
    Matt has a different process, fewer layers and more section painting – which I like too.
    Good luck, hope you can relax and enjoy experimenting in whatever paint you chose! Looking forward to seeing your work!

    #14309
    Linn Hansson
    Participant

    I agree with you both! πŸ™‚ I would like to use traditional oil paints, I do have a basic winton oil set of 10 which I got a few years ago when I wanted to try it out, but I never knew how to use them properly. I also have some zest-it which is supposed to be less toxic than thinners. I will take some time to think about it all and perhaps try both alternatives.
    I am however a but uncertain on how to store the waste of oils and cleaning solvents. Would a jar with a lid be okay and then to be taken to the recycle station once in a while?

    And I will also avoid cadmium as much as possible. I read an article about it some years ago which made me very aware of it. I just hope I do not have any other paints where cadmium is hidden – perhaps I need to check that out.

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